What can we learn from faeces? Assessing genotyping success and genetic variability in three mouse-eared bat species from non-invasive genetic sampling
 
More details
Hide details
1
Laboratorio di Genetica, Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale, Via Ca’ Fornacetta 9, 40064 Ozzano dell’Emilia (BO) and Institute of Zootechnics, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, 29122 Piacenza
2
Laboratorio di Genetica, Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale, Via Ca’ Fornacetta 9, 40064 Ozzano dell’Emilia (BO)
3
Laboratorio di Genetica, Istituto Superiore per la Protezione e la Ricerca Ambientale, Via Ca’ Fornacetta 9, 40064 Ozzano dell’Emilia (BO), Department of Zoology and Animal Cell Biology, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, C/ Paseo de la Universidad 7, 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz, and Systematics, Biogeography and Population Dynamics Research Group, Lascaray Research Center, University of the Basque Country,UPV/EHU, Avda. Miguel de Unamuno 3, 01006 Vitoria-Gasteiz
4
Wildlife Research Unit, Laboratorio di Ecologia Applicata, Dipartimento di Agraria, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Napoli)
5
Chirosphera Associazione per lo studio e la tutela dei chirotteri e l’ambiente, Via Morghen, 34 – 10143 Torino
6
Stazione Teriologica Piemontese S.Te.P., c/o Museo Civico di Storia Naturale, c.p. 89, 10022 Carmagnola (TO)
7
Museo di Storia Naturale la Specola, Via Romana, 17, 50125 Firenze
8
FaunaViva - Viale Sarca, 78 - 20125 Milano
9
GIRC
10
Department of Theoretical and Applied Sciences, Environment Analysis and Management Unit – Guido Tosi Research Group, University of Insubria, Via Dunant, Varese 3 I-21100
Publish date: 2016-12-30
 
Hystrix It. J. Mamm. 2016;27(2)
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
In the last century bat populations significantly declined mainly due to habitat fragmentation and degradation. As management-dependent species, bats need appropriate monitoring programs for the implementation of sound conservation strategies. However, bats’ small size, high mobility, elusiveness and nocturnal lifestyle make them difficult to survey. Non-Invasive Genetic Sampling (NIGS) may offer safe and cost-effective solutions, but requires well-planned sampling strategies, informative molecular markers and reliable laboratory protocols. Here we developed a NIGS protocol for species and individual identification of three mouse-eared bats, the Geoffroy’s bat (Myotis emarginatus), the long-fingered bat (Myotis capaccinii) and the Daubenton’s bat (Myotis daubentonii). Species identification was accomplished by mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequencing of reference tissue (n=49) and droppings (n=285) from Central-Northern Italy. In addition, we optimized a multiplex panel of seven microsatellites suitable for species and individual identification of the three species from droppings. We obtained a good success with mtDNA sequencing (245/285; 86%) and microsatellite genotyping (129/245; 53%). All microsatellites were successfully amplified with low error rates, and were polymorphic in the three Myotis species, with probabilities of identity 6 0.001 and observed heterozygosities of Ho=0.48 in M. emarginatus, 0.62 in M. capaccinii and 0.71 in M. daubentonii. Our protocol represents a useful tool for population genetic studies on mouse-eared bats that could likely be extended to other bat species and provide useful information to implement effective conservation plans.
eISSN:1825-5272
ISSN:0394-1914